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TriStar Skyline Medical Center Goes Red for Women

TriStar Skyline Medical Center February 03, 2017

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - TriStar Skyline Medical Center supports Go Red for Women by staff and patients participating in National Wear Red Day® on Friday, February 3. The hospital went red to advocate for women's heart health.

"The American Heart Association states that heart disease and strokes cause one in three deaths among women each year, killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds," said Heather Stafford, associate chief nursing officer at TriStar Skyline. "Our team joined the Go Red movement and is dedicated to raising awareness on the number one killer of women - heart disease."

TriStar Skyline is committed to educating women on heart disease prevention and reacting early to symptoms of a possible heart attack. The facility is partnering with the American Heart Association and its Go Red for Women initiative by promoting healthy lifestyle choices to reduce a woman's risk of experiencing a heart attack.

The American Heart Association’s “What it Means to ‘GO RED’” Acronym:

  • Get Your Numbers: Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose.
  • Own Your Lifestyle: Stop smoking, lose weight, be physically active and eat healthy.
  • Raise Your Voice: Advocate for more women-related research and education.
  • Educate Your Family: Make healthy food choices for you and your family. Teach your kids the importance of staying active.
  • Donate: Show your support with a donation of time or money.

GoRedForWomen.org

"We encourage women to schedule an annual wellness appointment with their healthcare provider to discuss preventative heart disease care," said Stafford. "We see heart disease affect females regardless of age. It is crucial if you think you, your grandmother, mother, sister, daughter or loved one is experiencing symptoms of a heart attack that you seek medical attention right away."

For a free physician referral, please call TriStar MedLine® at (615) 342-1919. If you're experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

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